When I was growing up, you simply weren’t a cool kid unless you had a Trapper Keeper. As the binder of the youths, the Trapper Keeper had folders aplenty for all your assignments, angsty song lyrics, and rad doodles you scribbled during math class. Basically, it was where everything school-related got lovingly filed or shoved away, ready to be grabbed at any moment.

That concept has sort of carried into our digital workstations, but something got lost along the way. In making our smartphones and tablets all-encompassing devices for work and play, it’s become increasingly difficult to maintain focus. What might start as a Google Docs, email, and Slack hub can quickly turn into a Super Mario Run machine or a tweetstorm factory.

Suddenly, you’re emailing your boss to ask for an extension on that already past-due project.

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Sure, you could do a digital detox, but eventually you’ll have to get back on your devices and likely relapse. That’s what inspired the reMarkable Paper Tablet—it’s a tablet, but with a laser focus on a few essential features. It sounds like paradise for those who dread working in the digital age, but if reMarkable wants to deliver on its promises, it has some work to do.

reMarkable Paper Tablet

4/10

Wired

Giant e-Ink display is rad. Wacom pen feels more like writing on paper than any other tablet. Having notes, sketches, and books on one device keeps your bag light. Annotating your digital books can be useful. You look super important when you’re scribbling away on the train.

Tired

There’s no good justification for the messy syncing system. Reading experience doesn’t stack up to the competition. Company has an unproven track record for support. Battery life is disappointing. The price is too darn high.